Monday, March 8, 2010

Union Oyster House

'Evening, everyone!
I hope you've been receiving alerts for my posts; 
there were no comments on B&B Friday,
and only a couple on my previous post.
I know Blogger can get kind of iffy at times,
so perhaps they didn't show up in your notifications.

Anywho, today I was curious as to what the oldest 
contiunally operating restaurant in New England was.
So I did a little web browsing, and discovered it to be
in Boston, Massachusetts!


Not only is Union Oyster House the oldest 
operating restaurant in New England, but it is also
the oldest operating restaurant in the entire United States!

The restaurant has been in business since 1826, 
but the building dates back to more than 250 years.
It was initially the Hopestill Capen's fancy dress goods business 
where in 1771, the oldest newspaper in the 
U.S. (The Massachusetts Spy) was first published.
When the war offically broke out in 1775, it became the
headquarters of the first paymaster of the Continental Army.
Afterward, in 1796, the prince of France lived on the second floor,
earning a living by teaching French to Boston's high society.
And finally, in 1826, it became the Atwood and Bacon Oyster House.


"The new owners installed the fabled semi-circular Oyster Bar — where the greats of Boston paused for refreshment. It was at the Oyster Bar that Daniel Webster, a constant customer, daily drank his tall tumbler of brandy and water with each half-dozen oysters, seldom having less than six plates.
The toothpick was first used in the United States at the Union Oyster House. Enterprising Charles Forster of Maine first imported the picks from South America. To promote his new business he hired Harvard boys to dine at the Union Oyster House and ask for toothpicks.
A college president was salad man here. Jack Coleman, President of Pennsylvania's Haverford College worked in total anonymity for a few months during his sabbatical when he secretly sampled some of America's rigorous jobs and lifestyles.
The Kennedy Clan has patronized the Union Oyster House for years. J.F.K. loved to feast in privacy in the upstairs dining room. His favorite booth "The Kennedy Booth" has since been dedicated in his memory.
"

 

 
 
 Yum!

6 comments:

  1. I am loving your blog, you are fuelling my enthusiasm for my trip in the Fall. The history and the B&B guides are wonderful:o)

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  2. I saw this restaurant highlighted on the Travel Channel, I believe. It is still extremely popular. Can you imagine a restaurant where people have been eating for nearly 200 years!!! Mom

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  3. Ooh looks lovely Erin - I love old b/w photos of restaurants that are still around, been to Boston a few times now but never been here. Another one to add to the list! Thank you for doing the research for me xo Btw, have been getting post notifications, just madly busy and have to turn the computer OFF when I am, or I get too distracted! But it's always lovely to see you when I'm having a visit to my favourite people! xox Happy week, Rachel

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  4. I can hardly stand it that picture of the Oyster House is so wonderful. I really enjoy your B and B tips So much! And the restaurant ones too.
    xx

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  5. I haven't been to the Union Oyster House in probably a decade. I live only 20 minutes from Boston so I should give it try.

    The chowder was really delicious as I remember it.

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  6. I have been having such a ball perusing your blog and learning about all these delightful places in new england that i never knew about. it makes me so nostalgic for home! i absolutely love union oyster house but never knew it was the oldest restaurant in the u.s.! i'm heading back to boston next month so i'll be sure to go there again. hmm, how i miss proper new england clam chowder!

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Thanks for your thoughts!

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